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Challenges
Vous pourrez également participer à de nombreux challenges en constant renouvellement (si possible :p)
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Votre ultime challenge sera de défacer HackBBS. De nombreuses failles sont présentes. A vous de les trouver et de les exploiter.

Cet ultime test permettra de constater votre réactions face à une faille.
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Ezine du moment: PHRACK/phrack35/p35-08.txt
                                ==Phrack Inc.==

                Volume Three, Issue Thirty-five, File 8 of 13

 
+=========================================================================+
                                                                           
 
                   A Beginners Guide to Novell Netware 386                 
 
                                                                           
 
                             Brought to you by:                            
 
                                                                           
 
                                 The Butler                                
 
 
+=========================================================================+

As most of you know NOVELL is the most popular PC network software around,with
that being the case I decided to put together a little file on just what you
can do with a NOVELL network.

* The information in this file is primarily for NOVELL NETWARE 386 networks!!!
If you have NOVELL NETWARE 286 some of this information may not be correct.

When the word "Network" is mentioned in this file I am referring to a PC-based
network or LAN (Local Area Network).

If you are not familiar with the concept of a "Network" I would suggest you
first get acquainted with it by either picking up a good book or if you have
access to one, go exploring.

This file is for those who have some experience with networks and or the
concept of a network.

(----------------------------------------------------------------------------)

Variations in Setups:

Every network is setup differently is some way.  Even within the same company
two different networks may be setup different.  The differences may be slight
or major and can consist of everything from menus to naming conventions.

Companies that install networks as a business are inconsistent with their
setups also because every network technician does things differently and every
customer wants things to be a certain way.

Keep this idea in mind when exploring different networks because most likely
the setup will be different from network to network.

(----------------------------------------------------------------------------)

Terminology:

 Bindery-- A database that contains definitions of entities such as users
           groups, and workgroups.  The bindery is comprised of three
           components: objects, properties, and property data sets.

 Console-- The monitor and keyboard at which you actually control fileserver
           activity.

 File Server-- The Computer that the Network software, applications, and some
               data reside on.  (Usually a very powerful one, i.e. Compaq 486
               with 1 gigabyte of storage).

 Groups-- A means of dealing with users collectively rather than individually.
          i.e. Word Processing, Accounting.

 LAN-- Local Area Network

 Login Script-- Similar to autoexec.bat, contains commands that initialize
                environmental variables, map network drives, and control the
                user's program execution.

 Netware-- Novell's Network Operating System.

 Netwire-- Novell's on-line information service, accessible via Compuserve.

 Network-- A group of computers that can communicate with each other.

 NIC-- Network Interface Card

 Novell-- Software Manufacturer

 Objects-- any physical or logical entities, including users, user groups,
           workgroups, file servers, print servers, or any other entity that
           has been given a name.

 Print Server-- A computer dedicated to controlling all jobs for a specified
                printer.

 Properties-- the characteristics of each bindery object.  Passwords, account
              restrictions, account balances, internetwork addresses, list of
              authorized clients, and group members are all properties.

 Property Data Sets-- the values assigned to an entity's bindery properties.

 Rights-- Rights control which directories and files a user or group can
          access and what the user or group is allowed to do with those
          directories and files.

 User-- Any person allowed to work on the network.

 WAN-- Wide Area Network

 Workstation-- Any usable computer connected to a network.

(----------------------------------------------------------------------------)

Netware Environment:

The SYS:SYSTEM directory is used for system administration and contains
operating system files, NetWare utilities, and programs reserved for
SUPERVISOR.

The SYS:PUBLIC directory is used for general access and contains NetWare
utilities and programs for regular network users.

The SYS:LOGIN directory contains the programs necessary for logging in.

The SYS:MAIL directory is used by NetWare-compatible mail programs.  This
directory also has and ID number subdirectory for each user that contains
the user login script and print job configurations.

(----------------------------------------------------------------------------)

Breaches in Security:

Set Allow Unencrypted Passwords=on/off.

Enter this command from the "CONSOLE".

By changing this command you will disable the encryption scheme which will
then allow you to sniff passwords from the cables between workstations and
servers.

By default Netware comes with usernames GUEST and SUPERVISOR that have no
passwords.

Also try names like TAPE, BACKUP, SERVER, REMOTE, CONNECT, NOVELL, etc...  If
you have access to an existing account use SYSCON to get a list of all the user
names, most likely there will be one or two accounts that don't have passwords.

Also on some of these accounts that do not have passwords, part of their logon
process is the execution of a batch file that executes the individual software
i.e. backup.  A batch file is a batch file so if its not disabled do the old
CTRL-C to break out of the batch file and roam around.  Some accounts like the
backup account must have supervisor rights so that everything can be backed up.
So if you can break out of one of these you can roam the whole Network.

There are also a few neat little programs out there in cyberspace that will
make your task of getting access a little easier:

        1.  THIEFNOV.ZIP ===> THIEFNOV is a TSR that will capture usernames
                              and passwords from a workstation on Novell
                              Networks. The Thief works by hiding in a user's
                              autoexec.bat file, and executing every time
                              someone tries to login to the network.  The Thief
                              captures their username and password and saves
                              them in a hidden file in the root directory of
                              their C: drive.

        2.  TEMPSUP.ZIP ====> TEMPSUP is a utility that will create a user for
                              you to play with.  TEMPSUP comes with two
                              programs, an executable and a NLM module. The
                              executable can be run by any user with access to
                              DOS but only gives you the rights of that user.
                              But, the NLM module can be loaded at the Console
                              and will give you Supervisor Rights to the whole
                              Network. The syntax is "Tempsup_username to be
                              created" i.e. f:> tempsup hacker <return>.

        3.  NETCRACK.ZIP ===> NETCRACK is a brute force hacking program
                              designed for Novell.  NETCRACK can be run with
                              out login in to the network but by just loading
                              ipx and netx.  NETCRACK starts with AAA and goes
                              from there trying to guess the password for any
                              user.  The syntax is "netcrack_username <return>.


These are the only programs I know of made especially for Novell and I have
personally tried them all out with excellent results.

If you do get access to a Novell Network and you are not sure what to do, then
go to the F:\PUBLIC directory and type HELP.  Novell comes with an online help
system that uses FOLIO Infobases.  The HELP system is very easy to navigate
through and is better that the actual Novell Manuals.  You can even download
the programs NFOLIO.COM & NFOLIO.EXE and the infobases *.NFO to your local PC
to examine further.

If you are using the brute force hacking method Novell will stop you dead in
your tracks if the Intruder Detection/Lockout option has been enabled because
after 3 unsuccessful login attempts the account is locked until a supervisor
resets it.

Intruder Detection/Lockout options are as follows:

        Detect Intruders:                       Yes/No
        Intruder Detection Threshold
        Incorrect Login Attempts:               #
        Bad Login Count Retention Time:         # Days    # Hours   # Minutes

        Lock Account After Detection:           Yes/No
                Length of Account Lockout:      # Days    # Hours   # Minutes


The following restrictions are optional for every user account:

        Account Disabled:                       Yes/No
        Account Has Expiration Date:            Yes/No
                Date Account Expires:
        Limit Concurrent Connections:           Yes/No
                Maximum Connections:
        Allow User To Change Password           Yes/No
        Require Password:                       Yes/No
                Minimum Password Length:
        Force Periodic Password Changes:        Yes/No
                Days Between Forced Changes:
                Date Password Expires:
                Limit Grace Logins:             Yes/No
                        Grace Logins Allowed:
                        Remaining Grace Logins:
        Require Unique Passwords:               Yes/No


Novell can also be setup so that users can only logon during certain hours,
i.e. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday thru Friday.

Trustee Assignments grant rights to specific users (or groups) that allow
them to use a file or directory in particular ways (i.e., only for reading)
The network supervisor can select the appropriate rights to assign to users
or groups in each directory or file.

A trustee assignment automatically grants users the right to see to the root of
a directory.  However, the users can't see any of the subdirectories unless
they also have been granted rights in the subdirectories.

Inherited Rights Masks are given to each file and directory when they are
created.  The default Inherited Rights Mask includes all rights. But this does
not mean that users have all rights; users can only use rights that they been
granted in trustee assignments.

If the Inherited Rights Mask is modified for a file or subdirectory below the
original trustee assignment, the only rights the user can "inherit" for the
file or subdirectory are rights that are allowed by the Inherited Rights Mask.
For example, if a user is granted Read right with a directory trustee
assignment, the right to read files in a subdirectory could be revoked by
having the Read right removed from the subdirectory's Inherited Rights Mask.

Both trustee assignments and Inherited Rights Masks use the same eight trustee
rights to control access to directories and file.

S -- Supervisory

        Supervisory right grants all rights to the directory or file.  At the
        directory level, this right grants all rights to the directory and to
        any files, subdirectories, or subdirectory files in that directory.
        The Supervisory right overrides any restrictions placed on subdirs or
        files with Inherited Rights Masks.  Users who have the Supervisory
        right in a directory can grant other users Supervisory rights to the
        directory, its files, and subdirectories.

        Once the Supervisory right has been granted, it can be revoked only
        from the directory is was granted to.  It cannot be revoked in a
        file or subdirectory.

R -- Read

        Read right allows users to open and read files.  At the directory
        level this right allows users to open files in a directory and read
        the contents or run the program.  At the file level, this right allows
        users to open and read the file (even when the right has been revoked
        at the directory level).

W -- Write

        Write right allows users to write to files.  At the directory level,
        this right allows users to open and write to (modify the contents of)
        file in the directory.  At the file level, this right allows users
        to open and write to the file (even if the right has been revoked at
        the directory level).

C -- Create

        Create right allows users to create directories and files.  At the
        directory level, this right allows users to create files and
        subdirectories in the directory.  At the file level, this right
        allows users to salvage a file after it has been deleted.

E -- Erase

        Erase right allows users to delete directories and files.  At the
        directory level, this right allows users to delete a directory as well
        as any files, subdirectories, and subdirectory files in that
        directory.  At the file level, this right allows users to delete the
        file (even when the right has been revoked at the directory level).

M -- Modify

        Modify right allows users to change directory and file attribute sand
        to rename subdirectories and files. At the directory level, this right
        allows users to change the attributes of and rename any file, subdir,
        or subdirectory file in that directory. At the file level, this right
        allows users to change the file's attributes or to rename the file
        (even when the right has been revoked at the directory level).

F -- File Scan

        File Scan right allows users to see files.  At the directory level,
        this right allows users to see files and subdirectories in a
        directory.  At the file level, this right allows users to see the file
        (even when the right has been revoked at the directory level).

A -- Access Control

        Access Control right allows users to modify trustee assignments and
        Inherited Rights Masks.

(----------------------------------------------------------------------------)

As a network user, you should be familiar with the operation of the personal
computer you are using.  If you have an IBM PC-type workstation, you should
also be familiar with basic Disk Operating System (DOS) commands.

User Basics is divided into the following ten sections.  The first section
explains basic networking concepts and gives an overview of how a NetWare
network operates.

The second section introduces the NetWare menu and command line utilities and
explains how to use them.

The next seven sections explain some basic network tasks:

o   Booting up
o   Logging in and out
o   Creating your login script
o   Mapping your drives
o   Sending messages
o   Managing files and directories
o   Printing

Some basic troubleshooting hints are covered under "What If ..." at the end of
each of these modules and are also listed in the index.

The last section lists some common error messages and how to respond to them.

This booklet does not explain how to perform every network task or how to use
every available network command.  For complete explanations of all network
tasks and commands, see NetWare v3.11 Utilities Reference.

INTRODUCTION TO NETWARE

If your personal computer is part of a NetWare network, it is connected to
other computers and peripherals.  You can share files and resources and
communicate with others in your workgroup, thus increasing productivity.

This introduction answers the following questions about using a NetWare
network:

o   What is a NetWare network?
o   How does a network operate?
o   How are files stored on a network?
o   Who can use the network?
o   How is information protected on a network?

WHAT IS A NETWARE NETWORK?

A NetWare network is a group of computers (such as IBM PCs or Macintoshes)
that are linked together so they can communicate and share resources.

Network users, each working on a different personal computer, can communicate
with each other via the network.  They can also share network resources (hard
disks on the file server, data, applications, and printers) and use any service
the network provides (for example, access to a mainframe system).

HOW DOES A NETWORK OPERATE?

To understand how a network operates, you must know about the principal
components of a network: the file server, the workstations, and the software
that runs on each----NetWare and operating systems like DOS, OS/2, VMS, UNIX,
and the Macintosh operating system.

Beyond these basic components, a NetWare network can incorporate mainframe
computers, backup devices, modem pools, and different types of servers (such as
file servers, print servers, or archive servers).

The Network Workstations and DOS

Workstations are the personal computers on which network users do their work.
Workstations are used much like non-networked personal computers.  The only
difference is that they can access files from more than just the local drives.
Each workstation processes its own files and uses its own copy of DOS.

The Network File Server and NetWare

The file server is a personal computer that uses the NetWare operating system
to control the network.  The file server coordinates all of the workstations
and regulates the way they share network resources.  It regulates who can
access which files, who can make changes to data, and who can use the printer
first.

All network files are stored on a hard disk in or attached to the file server,
instead of on diskettes or hard disks in individual workstations.

The NetWare Workstation

Workstations use two pieces of software to communicate with the file server,
the shell and a protocol.  The shell must be loaded into each workstation
before that workstation can function on the network.

The NetWare shell, either NET3 or NET4 (depending on whether you are using DOS
3.x or 4.x), directs workstation requests to DOS or NetWare.  When a
workstation makes a request (asks to do a task), the shell decides if it is a
workstation task (to be directed to DOS) or a network task (to be directed to
NetWare).  If the request is a workstation task (such as using the DOS DIR
command to list the files in a local directory), DOS should handle the request.
If the request is a network task (such as printing a job on a network printer),
NetWare should handle the request.  The shell sends the request to the
appropriate operating system, somewhat like a railroad track switcher sends
trains to the proper destination.

The workstation shell uses another file, IPX.COM, to send network messages to
the file server and, in some cases, directly to other network stations.  This
IPX protocol is the language the workstation uses to communicate with the file
server.

HOW ARE FILES STORED ON A NETWORK?

All network information is stored on the file server's hard disk.  The system
for storing that information is called the "directory structure."

The NetWare directory structure, or storage system, is organized into

o   File servers, which contain one or more
o   Volumes, which can span several hard disks and are divided into
o   Directories, which can contain other directories (subdirectories) and
o   Files.

A directory structure can be compared to a filing cabinet system.

o   The file server corresponds to the filing cabinet.

o   The volumes correspond to the filing cabinet drawers.  Each file server
    has at least one volume, the SYS volume, which is created when the server
    is installed.  In NetWare v3.11, however, one volume can span several
    hard disks.

o   The directories correspond to the hanging folders within the filing
    cabinet drawers.  You can create and delete directories to suit your
    organizational needs, much as you insert hanging folders into, and remove
    them from, a filing cabinet.

o   Directories can contain other directories, which are sometimes referred
    to as "subdirectories.  These directories within a directory then
    correspond to the manila folders inside the hanging folders.  They divide
    directories into smaller units, just as manila folders divide hanging
    folders into smaller units.

o   And finally, directories contain actual files, just as manila folders
    contain individual documents.  A file might be a letter or a list of
    addresses.  When you save information in a file, you give the file a
    unique name so you can retrieve it later.

WHO CAN USE THE NETWORK?

Before being able to work on the network, a person must be designated as a
network user.  Network users can be assigned four levels of responsibility on
the network.

o   Regular network users

o   Operators (file server console operators, print queue operators, print
    server operators)

o   Managers (workgroup managers, user account managers)

o   Network supervisors

Regular network users are the people who work on the network.  They can run
applications and work with files according to the rights assigned to them.

Operators are regular network users who have been assigned additional   
privileges.  For example, a file server console operator is a network user
who is given specific rights to use the FCONSOLE utility.

Managers are users who have been given responsibility for creating and/or
managing other users.  Workgroup managers can create and manage users; user
account managers can manage, but not create, users.  Managers function as
supervisors over a particular group, but they do not have supervisor
equivalence.

Network supervisors are responsible for the smooth operation of the whole
network.  Network supervisors maintain the system, restructuring and updating
it as needed.  Supervisors may also teach regular network users how to use the
network.

HOW IS INFORMATION PROTECTED ON A NETWORK?

All information on a NetWare network is stored in a central location---the file
server's hard disk.  However, all users should not be able to access all
information (such as payroll files).  In addition, users should not always be
able to access the same data file at the same time; otherwise, they may
overwrite each other's work.

To prevent problems like these, NetWare provides an extensive security system
to protect the data on the network.

NetWare security consists of a combination of the following:

o   Login security

    Login security includes creating usernames and passwords and imposing
    station, time, and account restrictions on users.

o   Trustee rights (privileges) assigned to users

    Trustee rights control which directories and files a user can access and
    what the user is allowed to do with those directories and files, such as
    creating, reading, erasing, or writing to them.

o   Attributes assigned to directories and files

    Directory and file attributes determine whether that directory or file
    can be deleted, copied, viewed, or written to.  Among other things, they
    also mark a file as shareable or non-shareable.

These three levels of security work together to protect the network from
unauthorized access.

REVIEW

This introduction explained the following:

o   A NetWare network links personal computers so users can communicate and
    share resources.

o   A NetWare network consists of two or more workstations and at least one
    file server.

    Workstations are personal computers on which network users do their work.
    Workstations run their own native operating system (for example, DOS) and
    process their own files.  They can access files, applications, and
    resources through the file server.

    File servers are personal computers that use the NetWare operating system
    to coordinate all network activities.

o   Workstations and the file server communicate via the NetWare shell, which
    must be loaded into each workstation (just as DOS must be loaded into
    each workstation).  NET3 or NET4 (the NetWare shells corresponding to DOS
    3.x or 4.x) sends workstation requests to the proper operating system
    (file server or workstation) for processing.

o   The shell uses a protocol, such as IPX, to send messages to the
    appropriate network station.

o   Information is stored on the file server in a directory structure that is
    made up of volumes, directories, and files.

o   There are four types of network users:  regular network users, network
    operators, network managers, and network supervisors.  The type of user
    you are is determined by your responsibilities.

o   NetWare's extensive security system prevents users from corrupting data
    in network files and prevents unauthorized users from accessing
    restricted files.

WHAT ARE MENU AND COMMAND LINE UTILITIES?

You use NetWare utilities to perform network tasks.  There are two types of
utilities: menu utilities and command line utilities.  Menu utilities let you
perform network tasks by choosing options from menus.  Command line utilities
let you perform tasks by typing commands at the DOS command line.  This section
explains how to execute both types of NetWare utilities.

WORK WITH MENU UTILITIES

Access a Menu Utility

To access a menu utility, such as FILER, type the utility's name
at the DOS prompt and press <Enter>.  The utility's main menu
is displayed along with a screen header showing the following:

o   The utility's full name
o   The current date and time
o   The directory path leading up to your current directory (some utilities)
o   Your username on your file server (some utilities)
o   Your connection number (some utilities)

Exit a Menu Utility

There are two ways to exit a menu utility:

o   Press <Escape> until an exit confirmation box appears.  Then highlight
    "Yes" and press <Enter>.

o   Press the Exit key (usually <Alt><F10>).  Do not press the Exit key to exit
    a menu utility if you have made changes within the utility; if you do, the
    changes are not saved.  Exiting via the Escape key saves your changes.

Additional Information

Once you have accessed a menu utility and the main menu is displayed, you are
ready to work.  Menu utilities use certain keys to perform special functions.
The utilities also have certain standard components.  The keys, wildcards, and
components are described below.

F1  (Help) Key.  Displays help screens.
    If you press the help screen once, a help screen that applies to the task
    you are currently working on appears.  The help screen describes all the
    options on the screen.  To get help on a specific option, highlight the
    option and press <Enter>.

    If you press the Help key twice, your computer's function key assignments
    are listed.  There are three screens containing function key assignments.
    Press the <PageDown> key to see subsequent screens.

F5  (Mark) Key.  Allows you to mark multiple items in a list so you can add or
    delete several items at once.

Esc (Escape) Key.  Has three functions:

    1)   If you are on a menu screen, pressing <Escape> allows you to return to
         a previous menu.

    2)   If you are at the main menu, pressing <Escape> causes an exit
         confirmation box to appear.  By highlighting "Yes" and pressing
         <Enter>, you exit the menu utility and return to the menu or command
         line prompt.

    3)   If you are performing a process, pressing <Escape> allows you to
         continue.

Wildcard characters (* and ?).  DOS and NetWare recognize these as universal
replacements for any other character or set of characters.  Wildcards can be
used to search for groups of volumes, directories, or files, or they can be
used to search for a particular file when you are unsure of its complete
name.

An asterisk (*) in a filename indicates that any character can occupy that
position and all remaining positions in the filename.  For example, in the
FILER utility, to copy all subdirectory's files with the extension .EXE to
another directory, type "*.EXE" in the menu's entry box and press <Enter>.

In contrast, a question mark (?) in a filename indicates that any character can
occupy that position, and that position only.  So, if you were to type
"ACCOUNT?.NEW", you would copy files like ACCOUNT1.NEW, ACCOUNT2.NEW, and so
on.

NetWare's use of wildcard characters differs from DOS's in one respect.  For
example, to represent all files in a directory, DOS expects you to type "*.*",
whereas NetWare only needs one asterisk (*).

For more information about wildcard characters (global filename characters),
see your DOS manual.

Components.  When you first access a menu utility, the main menu is displayed.
Menus contain options you can choose from.  Options can be selected one of two
ways:

o   You can use the arrow keys to highlight the option you want. Then press
    <Enter>.

o   You can type the first letter of an option to highlight that option.  If
    more than one option in the menu starts with the same letter(s), type
    enough additional letters to distinguish one option from the others.  (For
    example, if both "Search" and "Select" were options, you would have to type
    "Sel" to highlight "Select.")  Once the option you want is highlighted,
    press <Enter>.

When you select an option from the main menu, additional menus and displays
appear on the screen.  These displays include lists, entry boxes, insets,
forms, and confirmation boxes.  Each type of screen display is explained
below.

Lists               Lists are similar to menus, and items in the lists can be
                    selected the same way menu options are.  However, you can
                    also add to and delete items from some lists.  Lists may
                    have more than one column, and they may extend below the
                    screen display.  Press the Down-arrow key to see additional
                    items.  Pressing <Ctrl><PageDown> takes you to the bottom
                    of the list.  Pressing <Ctrl><PageUp> takes you to the top
                    of the list.

Entry boxes         Entry boxes are boxes in which you can get information,
                    such as a username or pathname.  The Delete, Backspace, and
                    arrow keys work in these boxes.

Insets              Insets display information that cannot be edited (except by
                    the network supervisor).  Regular users cannot add to or
                    delete from the information in this window.

Forms               Forms are windows that contain fields.  You can move around
                    in a form using the arrow keys or the Enter key.  (When you
                    press <Enter>, the cursor moves to the next field in the
                    form.)  You can change the information in the field by
                    highlighting the field and pressing <Enter>.

                    What you do next depends on the type of field.  Some fields
                    allow you to type in information; others display menu items
                    to select.

Confirmation boxes  Confirmation boxes are displayed whenever you exit a menu
                    utility or whenever you create or delete items (such as
                    directories or files).  You can either confirm or cancel
                    the action by selecting "Yes" or "No" and pressing <Enter>.

WORK WITH COMMAND LINE UTILITIES

Command Format

The command format displays the appropriate syntax for command line utilities.
Command line utilities are typed in at the DOS prompt.

The following are examples of the command formats for the NPRINT and the TLIST
utilities:

    NPRINT path [option...]  <Enter>

    TLIST [path [USERS | GROUPS]]  <Enter>

Conventions

The conventions for these example command formats are explained below:

NPRINT      Words that appear in all capital letters must be spelled exactly as
            shown.  Although they appear in capital letters, they can be typed
            in either upper or lower case.

path        Words that appear in lower case are variables.  They should be
            replaced with the information pertinent to your task.  In this
            case, "path" would be replaced with the path leading to and
            including the file you want to indicate, and you would replace
            "option" with any NPRINT options you want to specify.

[ ]         Square brackets indicate that the enclosed item is optional:  you
            can enter a command with or without the enclosed item.  In this
            case, "option" is optional.

....        Ellipses indicate that more than one option can be used with the
            command.  In this case, more than one NPRINT option can be entered
            in the command.

<Enter>     The angle brackets indicate that you should press the key whose
            name appears between them.

            Always press <Enter> after typing the command format for
command
            line utilities.

[[ ]]       Nested square brackets indicate that all enclosed items are
            optional.  However, if you use the item(s) within the innermost
            brackets, you must also use the item(s) within the outer brackets.

|           A vertical bar or "pipe" means "either, or."  You can use either
            the item to the left of the vertical bar or the item to the right,
            but not both.

Wildcard Characters

DOS and NetWare recognize wildcard characters (* and ?) as universal
replacements for any other character or set of characters.  Wildcards can be
used to search for groups of volumes, directories, or files, or to search for a
particular file when you are unsure of its complete name.

An asterisk (*) in a filename indicates that any character can occupy that
position and all remaining positions in the filename.  For example, to search
for all filenames with the extension .EXE in your default directory, type "NDIR
*.EXE" and press <Enter> to display the list.

In contrast, a question mark (?) in a filename indicates that any character can
occupy that position, and that position only.  So, if you were to type "NDIR
*.?", you would see a list of all files in your default directory with a
single-character extension or no extension at all.

NetWare's use of wildcard characters differs from DOS's in one respect.  For
example, to represent all files in a directory, DOS expects you to type "*.*",
whereas NetWare only needs one asterisk (*).

For more information about wildcard characters (global filename characters),
see your DOS manual.

GET HELP IN NETWARE

Use the NetWare HELP utility to view on-line information about NetWare
utilities, NetWare system messages, and NetWare concepts.  NetWare HELP allows
you to search for and retrieve information from infobases (information
databases).  To access HELP, type

    HELP  <Enter>

Press <Enter> again to bring up the main menu.  For more information on how to
use NetWare HELP, press the Tab key until you get to "How to use this
reference."  Then press <Enter>.

BOOT UP

To "boot up" your workstation means to turn on your computer, load DOS, and
then load the workstation shell.  You accomplish all of this with a boot
diskette, or you can put the necessary boot files on your workstation's hard
disk.  These boot files start up the workstation operating system, load the
NetWare shell, and gain access to the network.

Create Boot Diskettes

1.  Format a blank diskette as a boot diskette, using the DOS FORMAT command. 
    Insert a diskette into drive A and type

        Format a: /s  <Enter>

    Follow the screen prompts.

2.  Copy IPX.COM and the shell file (NETx.COM) onto the boot diskette or to the
    root directory of your workstation's hard disk.

    If your workstation uses DOS 3.x, use NET3.COM.

    If your workstation uses DOS 4.x, use NET4.COM.

3.  Copy these following additional boot files to the boot diskette or your
    hard disk, if needed.  Your network supervisor can provide you with these
    files:

    AUTOEXEC.BAT
    CONFIG.SYS
    SHELL.CFG

    See also "Boot files" in NetWare v3.11 Concepts and Appendix A in NetWare
    v3.11 Installation.

4.  Label the boot diskette.

Create an AUTOEXEC.BAT File

You can create an AUTOEXEC.BAT file that automatically loads the shell file
each time you boot the workstation.  This AUTOEXEC.BAT file can also set your
workstation to the first network drive (F), connect you (user MARIA) to a file
server (WONDER), and set your DOS prompt to show your current directory (PROMPT
$P$G).

Follow these steps to create your AUTOEXEC.BAT file:

1.  Insert your boot diskette into drive A and change to drive A.  If you plan
    to boot from your hard disk, change to your hard disk drive (C or D).

2.  If you are using DOS 4.x, type

        COPY CON AUTOEXEC.BAT  <Enter>
        IPX  <Enter>
        NET4  <Enter>
        F:  <Enter>
        LOGIN WONDER/MARIA  <Enter>
        PROMPT $P$G  <Enter>
        <Ctrl>Z  <Enter>

    If you are using DOS 3.x, replace NET4 with NET3.

LOGIN/LOGOUT

When you log in to a network, you establish a connection between your
workstation and the file server.  When you log out, you terminate that
connection.

To log in to the network, you must type in a unique password.  If there were no
password, other unauthorized users could easily get to your files and use them
for their purposes.

Log In to Your Network

To log in to your default server, type

    LOGIN servername/username  <Enter>

Replace servername with the name of the file server you want to log in to.
Replace username with your login name and (if applicable) type your password
when you are prompted for it.

Log Out of Your Network

To log out of your default server, type

    LOGOUT  <Enter>

To log out of a file server you are attached to, type

    LOGOUT servername  <Enter>

Attach to Another File Server

Attach to another file server if you want to do the following:

o   Send messages to users on that file server

o   Map a drive to that file server

o   Copy a directory to that file server

To access another file server while remaining logged in to your default file
server, type

    ATTACH servername/username  <Enter>

Replace servername with the name of the server you want to attach to.  Replace
username with the username you have been assigned to use on that file server.

Create or Change a Password

1.  To create or change a password on your default server, type

        SETPASS  <Enter>

    The following prompt appears on the screen:

    Enter your old password:

2.  If you are changing a password, enter the old password.  If you are
    creating a new password, press <Enter>.  The following prompt appears on
    your screen:

    Enter your new password:

3.  Enter the password you want.  The following prompt appears:

    Retype your new password:

4.  Enter the new password again.  The following message appears on your
    screen:

    Your password has been changed.

View Who You Are on Your Network

Type

    WHOAMI  <Enter>

Information similar to the following is displayed:

    You are user FRANK attached to server MKTG, connection 1
    Server MKTG is running NetWare v3.11.
    Login time:  Wednesday October 2, 1991  8:05 am

    You are user GUEST attached to server ACCT, connection 7
    Server ACCT is running NetWare v3.11.
    Login time: Wednesday, October 2, 1991  8:05 am


This screen display indicates that you are attached to both file servers MKTG
and ACCT.  Your username on MKTG is FRANK, and your username on ACCT is GUEST.

View File Servers on Your Network

Type

    SLIST  <Enter>

Information similar to the following appears:

    Known NetWare File Servers   Network   Node Address
    --------------------------   -------   ------------
    RECORDS                     [CED88]   [2608C234732]
    SALES                       [CED87]   [2608C217651]
    MFG                         [CED86]   [2608C293185]

View Current Users on Your File Server

You must be attached to a file server before you can view the list of users for
that file server.

Type

    USERLIST  <Enter>

Information similar to the following appears:

    User Information for Server BLOOM
    Connection  User Name     Login Time
    ----------  ---------     ------------------
    1           JOE           4-17-1991  8:05 am
    2           *CORRINE      4-17-1991 11:20 am
    3           PAULO         4-17-1991  7:58 am
    4           GUS           4-17-1991  6:01 pm

An asterisk (*) appears next to your username.

What If ...

.... I can't log in?

o   Your password may have expired or you may have run out of grace logins.

    Your supervisor or manager has to unlock your account.

o   You haven't changed to the network login drive (F).

o   The LOGIN.EXE file is missing.

o   Your shell may be outdated.  Type

        NVER  <Enter>

    Report the version number to your supervisor.

o   Your network board may not be seated correctly.

o   Your file server may be down.  Type

        SLIST  <Enter>

    If your file server is listed, log in by typing

        LOGIN servername/username  <Enter>

o   You may be restricted from logging in during certain times.  Ask the
    network supervisor.

.... My screen is frozen?

o   Your supervisor should run the MONITOR utility and clear your connection.
    This saves the work you were doing.  Then complete one of the two following
    tasks:

    o   To warm boot, press <CTRL><ALT><DEL> simultaneously.

    o   To cold boot, turn the computer OFF, wait 15 seconds, and then turn it
        ON again.

o   Your network cable may not be connected or terminated properly.  Notify
    your supervisor.

o   Your node (or station) address may be in conflict with another workstation.
    See if new workstations have been added to your network.

o   You may have the wrong IPX configuration.  Ask your supervisor.

o   You may have received a message while in graphics mode.  Disable messages
    before entering graphics mode by typing

        CASTOFF  <Enter>

CREATE YOUR LOGIN SCRIPT

Your login script is a program that automatically sets up your workstation's
environment each time you log in.  It performs tasks such as mapping network
drives for you, automatically executing programs and starting applications, and
attaching you to different file servers.

This section introduces some basic login script commands.

To access your login script, follow these steps:

1.  Type

        SYSCON  <Enter>

2.  Select "User Information" from the main menu.

3.  Select your user name from the list of users that appears.

4.  Select "Login Script."

5.  Enter the commands you need in your login script.  Some common commands are
    listed under "Common Login Script Commands" below.

6.  Exit and save the login script by pressing <Escape> and answering "Yes" in
    the confirmation box.

7.  To execute your new login script, you must first log out of the network,
    and then log in again.

Common Login Script Commands

The commands below can be used in your login script.  Each command is followed
by its purpose and an example of how to use it.

MAP INS16:=     Inserts the drive as the next available search drive.

                        MAP INS16:=pd3\sys:jan

MAP drive:=     Maps the specified drive to the given directory.

                        MAP G:=pd3\sys:home\jan

MAP *n:=        Maps the next available drive to the given directory.

                        MAP *1:=pd3\sys:home\jan

#               Runs an executable file (a file with an .EXE or .COM
                extension).

                        #SYSCON

REMARK          These three commands allow you to insert explanatory text in
*               the login script.  They will not appear on your screen.
;
                        REMARK Be sure to update the PROJECTS file.

                        * Check for new mail.

                        ; Assign OS-dependent Search mappings.

ATTACH          Allows you to attach to other file servers while remaining
                logged in to your current file server.

                ATTACH pd3\jan

SET             Allows you to set DOS variables.

                SET wp="/u-jlw/"

                SET usr="jwilson"

IF...THEN       Executes certain commands, if a specified condition exists.

                IF DAY_OF_WEEK="Monday" THEN WRITE "AARGH..."

What If ...

.... My login script doesn't execute all the way?

o   You may have inserted an EXIT command to a batch file in the middle of your
    login script.  Anything after the EXIT command is ignored.  Move the EXIT
    command to the end of your login script.

o   An IF...THEN clause in your login script may be incomplete or incorrect. 
    Check the proper command format in Appendix A of NetWare v3.11
    Installation.

.... I am unable to map a drive to another file server?

The file server you want to map a drive to may be down.  To check whether the
file server is up, type

        SLIST  <Enter>

.... I add some mapped drives to my login script and some I wanted are gone?

The system login script executes before the user login script.  You can
overwrite the mapped drives in the system login script with those in your user
login script.  Instead of using the command "map drive:=", use the command "map
ins 16:=" or "map *1:=". (Remember: You can have only 26 drive mappings.)

VIEW OR CREATE YOUR MAPPED DRIVES

Mapped drives point to particular locations in the directory structure.  In
NetWare, there are three type of drives: local drives, network drives, and
search drives.  Local drives are physically attached to a workstation.  Network
drives allow users to access particular locations in the directory structure.
Search drives allow users to execute program files (such as applications or
utilities) that are in a directory other than the user's current directory.
For more information, see "Drive mappings" in NetWare v3.11 Concepts.

This section tells you how to do the following:

o   View all mappings
o   Map network drives
o   Map search drives

View All Mapped Drives

Type

    MAP  <Enter>

You see information similar to the following:

    DRIVE A:  maps to a local drive
    DRIVE B:  maps to a local drive

    DRIVE F:= COUNT/SYS:  /HOME/KAREN
    DRIVE G:= COUNT/SYS:  /
    DRIVE H:= COUNT/ACCT: /ACCDATA

    -------

    SEARCH1:=Z:  [COUNT/SYS:  /PUBLIC]
    SEARCH2:=Y:  [COUNT/SYS:  /PUBLIC/WP]
    SEARCH3:=X:  [COUNT/ACCT:  /ACCREC]

Map Network Drives

Suppose you want to map a network drive to a directory in which you have files.
To see what network drive letters are available, type

    MAP  <Enter>

Choose a drive letter that is not being used, such as J.  Type

    MAP J:= path  <Enter>

Replace path with the directory path (including the file server name and the
volume name) leading to the directory to which you want to map network drive J.

For example, suppose your username is MARIA and you want to map drive J to your
home directory, which is on file server COUNT in volume SYS.  Type

    MAP J:= COUNT/SYS:HOME/MARIA  <Enter>

MAP SEARCH DRIVES

Suppose your search drives appear as follows:

    SEARCH1:=Z:  [COUNT/SYS:  /PUBLIC]
    SEARCH2:=Y:  [COUNT/SYS:  /PUBLIC/WP]

The next available search drive is SEARCH3 (S3).  To map a
search drive to directory ACCREC on volume ACCT, type

    MAP S3:=COUNT/ACCT:ACCREC  <Enter>

When you type MAP again, the new search drive appears:

    SEARCH1:=Z:  [COUNT/SYS:  /PUBLIC]
    SEARCH2:=Y:  [COUNT/SYS:  /PUBLIC/WP]
    SEARCH3:=X:  [COUNT/ACCT:  /ACCREC]

What if ...

.... I just mapped a drive and then rebooted, and now the mapped drive is gone?

Did you map the drive in your login script?  Drives mapped at the command line
are temporary----they are deleted when you log out of your file server or turn
off your workstation.  If you want the mapping to be permanent, you must enter
it in your login script.

.... The system won't accept my mapped drives?

o   You may not have rights to the directory you want to map to.  Change to
    that directory and type

        RIGHTS  <Enter>

    If your rights aren't sufficient, see your supervisor.

o   You may have used the wrong command format.


.... I just viewed my mapped drives and some of them seem to be incorrect?

Did you use the DOS CD command to change your default directory?  Changing
directories changes your mapping.

.... My search drives are in reverse order?

Search drives are numbered, but their associated drive letters begin in reverse
alphabetical order.  For example, the first search drive (Search 1 or S1)
appears as network drive Z, the second one appears as network drive Y, and so
on.  However, in your login script, they should appear in normal alphabetical
order.

SEND MESSAGES TO OTHER USERS

You can communicate with other users on your network by
sending messages from your workstation command line.

This section explains how to do the following:

o   Send a message to one or more users
o   Send a message to all workstations
o   Block/allow messages from other workstations

Send a Message to One or More Users

Suppose you want to send the following message to users CINDY and ERIC:
"Meeting at 1:30 today."  Also suppose that CINDY and ERIC are logged in to
your default server.  Type

    SEND "MEETING AT 1:30 TODAY" CINDY, ERIC  <Enter>

A confirmation message appears, telling you that the message was sent.

If CINDY is logged in to another file server called SALES, attach to that file
server and type

    SEND "MEETING AT 1:30 TODAY" SALES/CINDY  <Enter>

Send a Message to All Workstations

Suppose you want to send the following message to all workstations: "Paychecks
are here."  Type

    SEND "PAYCHECKS ARE HERE." EVERYONE  <Enter>

A confirmation message appears listing all the users to whom the message was
sent.

If you want to send a message to everyone on another file server, you must be
attached to that file server and specify the name of the file server in the
command.


Block/Allow Messages from Other Workstations

If you do not want to receive messages sent to you from any network stations,
type

    CASTOFF   <Enter>

The following message appears on your screen:

    Broadcasts from other stations will now be rejected.

To allow your workstation to again receive messages from other network users,
type

    CASTON  <Enter>

The following message appears on your screen:

    Broadcast messages from the console and other stations will now be
    accepted.

What If ...

.... I am unable to send a message to a user?

o   Is the user logged in?  Type

        USERLIST  <Enter>

o   Is your message buffer full?  You can only receive up to two messages. You
    must clear these messages from your screen (by pressing <Ctrl><Enter>)
    before you can receive others.

o   Did you type the SEND command properly?

.... I am unable to send messages to users on another file server?

o   Did you attach to that file server?
o   Is the user logged in?  Type

        USERLIST  <Enter>

o   Did you type the SEND command properly?


MANAGE FILES AND DIRECTORIES

You can manage your files and directories in a variety of ways.  You can copy,
delete, rename, view, write to, share, and print them.  NetWare uses a system
of file and directory rights and attributes to make sure that only authorized
network users can access and handle network data.

Attributes are assigned to files and directories.  They override rights, which
are assigned to users.  For example, suppose you have the right to rename files
(the Modify right).  However, the file you want to copy is flagged with the
Rename Inhibit attribute.  This prevents you from renaming it, even though you
have the right to do so.

For more information, see "Attributes" and "Rights" in NetWare v3.11 Concepts.

Know Your Rights

To view your rights in your default directory, type

    RIGHTS  <Enter>

If your effective rights include all rights, the following information appears:

    SERVER1\SYS:PUBLIC\UTIL
    Your effective rights for this directory are [SRWCEMFA]
        You have Supervisor Rights to Directory. (S)
       *May Read from File.                      (R)
       *May Write to File.                       (W)
        May Create Subdirectories and Files.     (C)
        May Erase Directory.                     (E)
        May Modify Directory.                    (M)
        May Scan for Files.                      (F)
        May Change Access Control.               (A)

    *Has no effect in directory.

    Entries in Directory May Inherit [SRWCEMFA] rights.  You have ALL RIGHTS to
    Directory Entry.

Copy a File to Another Network Directory

Suppose you want to copy a file called ACC.DAT from your default directory (for
example, F) to the SALEPROG directory in volume SYS on the file server SALES.
First, make sure you have a drive (for example, G) mapped to SALEPROG as
follows:

    G:=SALES/SYS:SALEPROG

To copy ACC.DAT from your default directory to the SALEPROG directory, type

    NCOPY F:ACC.DAT TO G:  <Enter>

Suppose you want to copy a file called ACC.DAT from the SALEPROG directory in
volume SYS on the file server SALES to your default directory.  Also suppose
drive G is mapped to SALEPROG as G:=SALES/SYS:SALEPROG.  Type

    NCOPY G:ACC.DAT F:  <Enter>

Copy All of a Directory's Files to Another Directory

1.  Type

        FILER  <Enter>

    and select "Directory Contents" from the "Available Topics" menu.

2.  Select the directory you want to copy from the "Directory Contents" window.
    The "Subdirectory Options" window appears.

3.  Select "Copy Subdirectory's Files."  The "Copy Subdirectory To:" window
    appears.

4.  To copy subdirectory files, complete one of the following:

    o   Copy to a subdirectory in your current directory.  Type the name of the
        directory; then press <Enter>.

        You can also use <Insert> to bring up the "File Servers/Local Drives"
        window, from which you can select your directory path by selecting file
        server, volume, and directory options.

        After you select your directory path, press <Escape> to bring your
        cursor back to the "Copy subdirectory To:" window.  Then press <Enter>
        to copy your subdirectory's files.

    o   Copy to a directory on another volume on your file server.  Type in the
        name of the volume and directory; then press <Enter>.

        You can also use <Insert> to bring up the "File Servers/Local Drives"
        window, from which you can select your directory path by selecting file
        server, volume, and directory options.

    o   Copy to a directory to another file server.  You must be attached to
        the file server you want to copy files to.  Type in the name of the
        file server, volume, and directory; then press <Enter>.

Delete a File

1.  Type

        FILER  <Enter>

2.  Select "Directory Contents" from the "Available Topics" menu.

3.  Highlight the file you want to delete from the "Directory Contents" window
    and^S press <Delete>.  Answer "Yes" in the confirmation box.

    To delete more than one file, use the Mark key (<F5>) to highlight multiple
    files; then press <Delete>.  Answer "Yes" in the confirmation box.

Salvage a File You Just Deleted

1.  Type

        SALVAGE   <Enter>

2.  Select "View/Recover Deleted Files" from the "Main Menu Options"window. 
    To change to another volume, you must select the directory path from the
    "Select Current Directory" option in the main menu.

Note:   If you have too many salvageable files to fit on the screen, you will
        see the heading "Inc^Qomplete."  Scroll through the list to see the
        entire list, or use the Mark Pattern key <F6> to mark the file pattern.
        Then exit the list and reenter it.

3.  To salvage files using wildcards or to salvage a specific file, type the
    information in the "Erased File Name Pattern To Match" window.

    To view all salvageable files, press <Enter>.

4.  To salvage a file, complete one of the following:

    o   Salvage a single file.  Select the file you want to salvage. Select
        "Yes" from the "Recover This File" box.

    o   Salvage multiple files.  Use the Mark key (<F5>) to select multiple
        files.  Select "Yes" from the confirmation box.

    o   Salvage multiple files using wildcards.  To match a filename pattern or
        extension, press the Mark Pattern key (<F6>) and type the pattern you
        want to match.

        Once you match the pattern of the files you want to salvage, press
        <Enter> and select "Yes" from the "Recover ALL marked files?"
        confirmation box.

5.  Press <Escape> to exit SALVAGE.

Find a Lost File

Suppose you don't remember the location of a file.  The file is called
FUTURE.DAT.  You think it may be in the PROGRAMS directory, and drive G is
mapped to that directory.

To find the location of the lost file, type

    NDIR G: FUTURE.DAT  <Enter>

If you don't know which directory the file is in, change directories back to
the volume level.  Then type

    NDIR filename sub  <Enter>

The NDIR utility searches all those directories you have rights to on the
volume for the file.

Rename a Directory

Suppose you want to change the name of the ACCT directory to PROGRAMS.  Also
suppose drive G is mapped to ACCT in volume SYS on file server RECORDS as
follows:

    Drive G: = RECORDS/SYS:ACCT

To rename the directory, type

    RENDIR G: PROGRAMS  <Enter>

Note:   You must be attached to a file server before you can change the name of
        a directory on that file server.

        You must also have the Modify right in the directory to rename
        subdirectories in that directory.

        Drive mappings in login scripts (if they exist) must be changed to
        reflect the new name of the directory.

What If ...

.... I can't copy?

o   You may not have sufficient rights.  Type

        RIGHTS  <Enter>

    You must have the Create right to copy files into a directory.

o   The file may be flagged "non-shareable" and may be in use. Type

        FLAG filename  <Enter>

    If it is flagged "non-shareable," try again at a later time, when the file
    is not in use.


.... I can't see a directory?

o   You may not have enough rights to that directory.  Type

        RIGHTS  <Enter>

o   The directory attribute may be set to "Hidden" or "System." Type

        FLAG filename  <Enter>

o   The directory may have set disk space limitations.  To view the directory
    restrictions, type

        DSPACE  <Enter>

o   The directory may have been deleted.  Ask your supervisor.

PRINTING

Printing from a network workstation is similar to printing from a stand alone
workstation.  When you send a print job to a network printer, however, the job
is routed first through the file server and then delivered to the printer by
the print server.

When a print job leaves the workstation, it is stored temporarily in a print
queue on the file server.  This queue, which is a subdirectory on the file
server, stores the print job until the print server can deliver it to the
printer.  When the printer is ready to service the job, the print server moves
it from the queue to the printer.

Permanently Set Up Workstation Printing

If you want to print from a non-NetWare-compatible application or from the
screen, you need to route print files from your local printer port (LPT1) to a
file server queue.

1.  Enter the SYSCON utility.

2.  Select "User Information" from SYSCON's main menu.

3.  Select your username.

4.  Select "Login Script."

5.  Insert the following command into the login script:

        #CAPTURE Q=queuename TI=5

6.  Exit SYSCON, saving changes when prompted.

7.  Log back in to or reboot your workstation to allow the CAPTURE command to
    take effect.

Print Screens Using CAPTURE

Before you start printing screens using CAPTURE, you need to set the CAPTURE
parameters in your login script.  See "Permanently Set Up Workstation Printing"
on the previous page. Also, your supervisor needs to set up a default queue.

1.  At the command line, type

        CAPTURE  <Enter>

    You can include any of the CAPTURE options except Show.  Some of the most
    common CAPTURE options are the following:

    L=n
        Indicates which of your workstation's LPT ports (local parallel
        printing ports) to capture.  Replace "n" with 1, 2, or 3.  Default:

  ^S^Q      L=LPT1

    Q=queuename
        Indicates the queue the print job should be sent to.  If multiple
        queues are mapped to a printer, you must include this option.  Replace
        "queuename" with the name of the queue.

    TI=n
        Indicates the number of seconds between the last time the application
        writes to the file and the time it releases the file to the queue. 
        Include this option if you want to print from an application without
        exiting the application.  Replace "n" with a number of seconds
        (1-1000).  Default: TI=O  (Timeout disabled)

2.  Access the application containing the screen you want to print.

3.  Press <Shift><Print Screen>.

4.  If you want to print more screens, repeat steps 2 and 3.

5.  When you have selected the screens you want printed, return to the DOS
    prompt and type

        ENDCAP  <Enter>

    ENDCAP sends your print job to the default print queue of your default file
    server, and then the job is printed. ENDCAP also ends the capture of your
    LPT port.

Note:   Your workstation might hang if you press the <Shift><Print Screen> keys
        when none of your LPT ports are captured and no local printers are
        attached to your workstation.  To prevent this, ask your supervisor to
        include the following line in the SHELL.DFG file on your workstation
        boot disk.

        LOCAL PRINTERS = 0

List the Jobs in a Queue

A queue is a special directory where print files are stored while waiting for
printer services.  To see which jobs are waiting in a queue to be printed,
complete the following steps:

1.  Type

        PCONSOLE  <Enter>

2.  Select your file server (if other than your current file server).

3.  Select "Print Queue Information" from the "Available Options" menu.

4.  Select the print queue whose print job you want to view.  If you don't know
    the name of the print queue, ask your supervisor.

5.  Select "Current Print Job Entries" from the "Print Queue Information" list.
    The print job entries are displayed.

Delete Your Print Job from a Queue

You can cancel your print job by deleting it from the print queue (even after
the job has started printing).  You can delete a print job only if you are the
owner of the job or if you are the print queue operator.

To delete your print job, complete the following steps:

1.  Type

        PCONSOLE  <Enter>

2.  Select "Print Queue Information" from the "Available Options" menu.

3.  Select the print queue whose entries you want to view.  The "Print Queue
    Information" list is displayed.

4.  Select "Current Print Job Entries."

5.  Highlight the print job entry and press <Delete>.

6.  Select "Yes" at the confirmation box.

What If...

.... I send commands to print a screen, but it doesn't print?

Did you include the CAPTURE command in your login script?  See a previous
section called "Permanently Set Up Workstation Printing."

.... The application I'm using says that the print job was sent, but it doesn't
print out?

o   Did you use CAPTURE to redirect output to a print queue first?

o   Are the LPT ports captured?  Type

        CAPTURE SH  <Enter>

o   Check PCONSOLE and find the appropriate queue.  If the queue has a long
    list of jobs and none are marked "active," see your print server operator.
    If your job isn't in the queue, the application is not set up properly;
    check with the applications expert.

COMMON ERROR MESSAGES

Error messages point to a software or hardware error that doesn't allow further
processing.  An explanation of the nature of the message and a recommended
course of action follow each message listed below.

"Access denied"

Explanation 1

This message indicates one of the following:

o   You entered your username, your password, or both incorrectly.
o   You tried to log in to a file server on which you are not defined as a
    user.

Action 1

Try to log in again and make sure you type the username and password correctly.
Make sure you are logging in to a file server on which you are defined as a
user or as a member of a group.  You can log in to most file servers as GUEST
because user GUEST seldom requires a password.

Explanation 2

You tried to copy, delete, rename, or modify the file attributes of a file for
which you lack rights.

Action 2

Find out about your rights to this file by typing

    RIGHTS filename  <Enter>

or by asking your supervisor.



"A File Server could not be found"

Explanation

The shell tried to build a connection with the network, but no file server
responded to the request in the given time limit.

Action

Check the cable connection and make sure at least one active file server exists
on the network.  Also ask your supervisor to make sure the IPX file and the
network board have the same configuration.


"Message NOT sent to <servername>/<username> (station number)"

Explanation

If a number of messages have been sent to the user or group and have not been
cleared, either of the following may be true:

o   The workstation's buffer for incoming messages may be full.

o   The message was not sent to the user or group because the user or group
    used the CASTOFF utility.

Action

Send the message later, or try another method of communication.


"Network Error <cause> during <operation>.  File = <drive>:<filename> Abort,
Retry or Fail?" (or "Abort, Retry?")

Explanation 1

The shell called a function call or a DOS interrupt, but the specified
operation could not be performed.  The <drive>:<filename> specify the drive and
filename on which the error condition occurred.

Action 1

Press the R key to retry the operation and, if necessary, repeat this several
times.  If the problem persists, ask your supervisor or look up the specific
message in NetWare v3.11 System Messages.

Explanation 2

Your file server may be down.

Action 2

Press the A key to abort the operation, and then try to connect to the file
server again.  If this attempt fails, contact your supervisor.

"Password has expired"

Explanation

This message indicates your password has expired.

The network supervisor can require users to periodically change their passwords
on the file server to protect the file server from access by unauthorized
persons.  The network supervisor can also assign a number of grace logins
during which users can still use their old passwords (after they have expired)
before having to create new passwords.

Action

Use the SETPASS command to change your password.  If you use the old password
during your remaining grace logins, be sure to change it before you run out of
grace logins, or else your network supervisor has to change it for you.

"Password has expired and grace period has also expired."

Explanation

This message indicates that your user account is locked because your password
has expired and you have used all your grace logins.

After your password expires, you may have a number of grace logins during which
you can still use your old password.  If you do not change your password before
your grace logins are used, you are denied access.

Action

Since you have run out of grace logins, you cannot access your account until
your network supervisor or manager assigns you a new password.

"Server <servername> not found"

Explanation

This message indicates that you tried to attach to the file server
<servername>, but the file server did not respond for one of the following
reasons:

o   You mistyped the name of the file server.
o   You specified a file server not cabled to your network.
o   You specified a file server that is down for system maintenance.

Action

o   Type the file server name correctly.

o   Use the SLIST command to list all the available file servers.

o   If the file server is down for maintenance, try the command later when the
    file server has been brought back up.

If you still have problems, ask your network supervisor for help.

"Unable to attach to server <servername>"

Explanation

This message indicates one of the following:

o   You mistyped the name of the file server.
o   You specified a file server not cabled to your network.
o   You specified a file server that is down for system maintenance.

Action

o   Type the file server name correctly.

o   Use the SLIST command to list all available file servers.

o   If the file server is down for maintenance, try the command later when the
    file server has been brought back up.

If you still have problems, ask your network supervisor for help.

"User <fileserver>/<username> not found"

Explanation

This message indicates that you either specified a user who does not exist on
<fileserver> or mistyped the user's name.

Action

o   Make sure you have typed the user's name correctly.

o   If you are not certain which users are established on the file server, use
    the SYSCON utility to view the list of network users.

o   You can also use the USERLIST command to view a list of currently attached
    users.

(----------------------------------------------------------------------------)

One of the most useful tools that any Novell Network user can have is access to
Netwire on Compuserve.  Netwire is a forum that contains messages, files, and
access to Novell product information firsthand.  You can submit questions to
Novell technicians and hundreds of other Novell users.  A must for any Netware
user.

Another handy tool for those that do have access is the SALVAGE program.
SALVAGE will let you undelete files throughout the system unless the directory
is marked to be purged.  PURGE is nice too because it will allow you to
completely erase any files you created or copied.  To use purge and or salvage
make sure you are mapped to the public directory and execute them from any DOS
prompt.

(----------------------------------------------------------------------------)

As far as dialing up a Novell Network the means are unlimited.  Some have very
tight security systems that only let users with certain hardware dial-in and
others limit the usernames that are allowed dial-in access.
______________________________________________________________________________



Manifest
Le but de ce site est de mieux comprendre la sécurité informatique.
Un hacker par définition est une personne qui cherche à améliorer les systèmes d'information dans le seul et unique but de contribuer à la stabilité de ces systèmes!
La croyance populaire laisse entendre que les hackers sont des pirates.
C'est vrai. Mais il y a différents types de pirate.
Tout comme il y a différents types de personnes.
Les bavures courantes auxquelles on pense lorsqu'on évoque le terme de pirate informatique
seraient les hacks de compte msn, ordinateurs lâchement trojantés avec des exploits déja tous faits
et encore peut-on classifier en tant que hack le fait de spammer
alors que depuis plus de 15 ans des scripts déja tous faits le font déjà extrèmement bien?

Ce ne sont pas des hackers qui font ça!!!
Nous appelons ces gens des lammers! Quand ils sont mauvais,
ou des black hat lorsqu'ils sont doués dans la mise en application de leurs méfaits.
Aucun amour propre - Aucune dignité
Agissent par dégout, vengeance ou simple plaisir.
Les raisons peuvent être nombreuses et je ne prétends pas devoir juger qui que ce soit.
Je pense juste que l'on ne doit pas utiliser l'épée de fly pour commettre des injustices.
Il est 100 fois plus profitable d'améliorer un système que de marcher sur un château de sable... même si marcher sur un château de sable est rigolo :P
A vous de trouver votre amusement. ;)

Tu peux réagir sur la shootbox


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